Home > Excel Class Guide > Beginning Excel

Beginning Excel Class for Business and Industry

Beginning Microsoft Excel Training

Next Class: 9/01/2022

More Dates >

Learn the must know Excel skills needed to quickly accomplish everyday Excel workplace tasks in business and industry.

See What You Master
Close
Your first step to mastering Excel.

How our class can help you.

Our 1-day class shows you the Excel skills needed to perform a variety of tasks in today's workplace. Businesses and organizations more than ever expect a higher degree of Excel skills than just a few years ago and our class will deliver for you.

We cover the Excel basics like entering data, worksheet formatting, copying / pasting, sorting, and filtering data. Our class also covers need to know topics like problem layout, formula / function construction, dragging and filling formulas, and basic chart design.

Join us and our class will show you the skill sets you need to get up and running in Excel fast.

Free Repeats
Repeat your Excel class with us for an entire year for free.
Free Repeats
NASA Project
See how we helped NASA with the Mars Rover using Excel.
NASA
Discounts
We provide discounts to active / retired US Military and DOD.
Discounts
Customers
View our customers like Apple, Boeing, and the US Army.
Customers

Key beginning Excel topics covered in class.

Beginning Excel Preview

Click to enlarge, scroll < > if hidden.

Detailed class syllabus.

Class Syllabus Dates / Signup

Available: Public >, Virtual >, Onsite >

How we run the class: We focus our beginning training on what our customers need. When training begins, we analyze those needs and shift our training outline appropriately. We will stress topics or add topics that our customers want. No two training sessions are ever the same with EMAGENIT.

How to Control Excel's Ribbon, Dialog Boxes, Shortcut Menus, and Help

How to Control and Select Workbooks, Worksheets, and Cells

Typing, Filling, and Setting the Number Format of Worksheet Data

Copying and Pasting Worksheet Data, Charts, Shapes... in Excel

How to Format Worksheets, Merge Cells, and Make Useful Forms

Using Drawing Shapes and Pictures to Enhance a Worksheet's Content

Designing Worksheet Tables to Store Data

Laying Out a Worksheet Problem and Building Formulas for It

Using Functions to Quickly Calculate Worksheet Data

Using Excel's Filter, Sort, and Totaling Tools to Report Data

Creating Basic Chart Reports in Excel

Printing Worksheets and Charts in Excel

Additional Classes:
Class Syllabus Dates / Signup

Excel skills needed for our class.

Select this training if you or your group have:

  • Performed basic computer operations like typing and using the mouse
  • Never opened Microsoft Excel or have just seen it
  • Never heard of a workbook, worksheet, cell, or cell reference
  • Just typed data in a cell
  • Never typed formulas
  • Never copied, sorted, or filtered data
  • Have no idea what we just said

The class details.

If you need to contact us about our class.

Phone Number: 1.805.498.7162

Business Hours: 8:30 - 5:00 PM PT

You can email us at info@emagenit.com >

Contact us by form.

Click to View Form

FAQ for Beginning Excel Class

How to Use Cell and Range References in a Formula

Back to FAQ for Beginning Excel >

A cell reference identifies a cell's position on a worksheet. A range reference identifies a group of cells and their position on a worksheet. These references tell a Microsoft Excel formula > and other Microsoft Excel features where to obtain a value or group of values. Some common cell and range references used in a formula are presented in the table below:

Refers To Reference

A2

The cell in column A and row 2, a cell reference

A1:A10

The cells between row 1 and row 10 column A, a range reference

B1:C10

The cells between row 1 and 10 columns B and C, a range reference

D:D

All the cells in column D, a range reference

2:2

All the cells in Row 2, a range reference

D:E

All the cells in columns D through E, a range reference

By default, Excel uses what is called A1 reference style, which refers to columns with letters and refers to rows with numbers. These letters and numbers are called row and column headings. That is what is being used on this page.

If you see a formula and you start to see =R1C1+1 in it, you are in what is called R1C1 reference style. Only an advanced Excel user uses this notation and very rarely is it seen. To make the matter short, get out of this mode, refer to Excel help by typing in A1 Reference style to see how to toggle it back to the A1 style most commonly used.

What do the Dollar Signs Mean in a Cell or Range Reference?

Back to FAQ for Beginning Excel >

When you place dollar signs around a cell  or range reference, you are preventing the reference from changing when you copy or paste a cell with a formula in it or drag it. Cell and range references can move relative to your copy and paste, that is what they are designed to do by nature.

For example, if you had a cell with a formula in it, say cell B2 = A1+1 and you copied cell B2 to B3 then the formula would shift to be cell B3 =A2+1 because it moved relative to your copy. If you wrapped dollar signs around A1 like =$A$1+1 then when you copied the formula it would stay fixed on cell A1 and not change.

You can easily put dollar signs around a cell reference or range reference by highlighting the reference in the formula and pressing the F4 function key. The F4 key will cycle you through all the dollar sign configurations as you keep pressing it. Here are what the dollar signs mean:

Refers To Reference

A1

When cell copied and pasted or dragged, cell reference will shift relative to new cell position

$A$1

When cell copied and pasted or dragged, cell reference will not move

$A1

When cell copied and pasted or dragged cell reference will move row position if new position is off current row but will not shift column number

A$1

When cell copied and pasted or dragged, cell reference will move column notation if new position is off current column but will not shift row position

How to Create a Cell or Range Reference for Another Worksheet in a Formula

Back to FAQ for Beginning Excel >

To refer to another Excel worksheet, place the worksheet name in front of the reference followed by an explanation point !. For example, to refer to Sheet2 cell A1 the syntax (grammar) for a formula would be:

=Sheet2!A1+1

If the sheet name has non alpha-numeric characters or spaces in it, use apostrophes to enclose the name, for example for a worksheet named Data Sheet the syntax would be:

='Data Sheet'!A1+1

Note that if you build your formula by clicking and highlighting cells with the mouse, Excel will build the basic cell references including sheet names automatically.

To build a formula that refers to cells on another worksheet with the mouse, first type an = sign in a cell. Next click on the tab that has the cells or range to use and select them with the mouse. Watch the formula bar above the column headers and you will see the formula being built.

When you are on another worksheet, you can click in the formula and add operators and values. You build the formula the exact way as discussed on the previous page.

When you are done building the formula just press Enter. You do not click back on the original worksheet tab as this may skew the formula if the last entry is a cell or range reference

What is an Excel Formula and How Does It Work?

Back to FAQ for Beginning Excel >

An Excel formula is what you type in a worksheet cell to perform a calculation on a Microsoft Excel worksheet. Basic Microsoft Excel formulas basically look like normal math equations with computer operators standing in for some traditional math operators. The basic operators used in a formula are: Division: /, Multiplication: *, Addition: +,  Subtraction: -, and Power: ^.

To begin a formula in a cell, you type an = sign followed by operators, cell references, and numbers. For example if you typed =16.95 * 25 in a worksheet cell the value returned would be 423.75. To make the formula adaptive, you can replace the 16.95 and 25 with cell references like = C6 * C7. When enter is pressed, the formula will multiply the values that are in cells C6 and C7 and display the value in the cell. If either C6 or C7 is changed in value and Enter is pressed, the formula referencing those cells will recalculate automatically displaying the new value.

What is an Excel Formula and How Does It Work?

Click to enlarge, scroll < > if hidden.

The example above demonstrates what a formula looks like in a worksheet cell and how it calculates. Input and Output areas are designated on the worksheet to let the user know where information is typed (inputs) and where the formulas are (outputs). While simple in construct, it begins to show interface construction and organization help a user find things on a worksheet.

How to Build a Formula in an Excel Worksheet Cell

Back to FAQ for Beginning Excel >

Before beginning to create a formula, look at your equations and type all the information they need to calculate on the worksheet. Think about the numbers you punch into a calculator and those are the values to put on a worksheet. To create a formula in a worksheet cell, first begin with an = sign.

Next click on the first cell reference to use in the formula with your mouse or type a value. Next type an operator like + then click on the next cell reference with your mouse or type the next value and so forth. Operators go in between the cell references and values. ( )'s are placed around operations like (4/3) because you want to calculate that operation first before its value is used by other operations.

Repeat this process until you are finished building the formula then press Enter. Note when mixing operators like = 5 + 3 * 2 in a formula, there is an operator precedence which means certain operations occur before others. In this case 3 * 2 runs first followed by + 5. That is why you use ()'s to override this order and force operations to go first like (5+3) then * 2.

How to Create an Excel Worksheet Formula

Click to enlarge, scroll < > if hidden.

The example above demonstrates how to type a formula in a worksheet cell using the mouse and keyboard. When entering a cell reference in a formula, it is best to click on it with the mouse so you do not make a typing error.

How to Use the A1 and R1C1 Cell Reference Styles in Worksheet Formulas

Back to FAQ for Beginning Excel >

Excel allows an individual to use two styles of cell references > to identify a cell’s position in a formula >, A1 and R1C1 reference styles. These styles are controlled by adjusting the controlling options of Microsoft Excel.

The A1 reference style is the default reference style for Excel. To tell if the A1 reference style is in use, look at the column headers of a worksheet. If letters appear for the column headings, the reference style for Excel is currently A1.

In this mode, cells are referenced in formulas using a letter for the column and a number for the row. The picture below demonstrates this concept with a simple formula.

A1 Reference in an Excel Formula

Click to enlarge, scroll < > if hidden.

The example above demonstrates what A1 reference style looks like in Excel. Notice the column headers are letters. This is the most common way to build formulas in Excel. Note that cell references appear in the formula with a letter and a number.

What is an R1C1 Style Cell Reference in an Excel Formula?

Back to FAQ for Beginning Excel >

To tell if the R1C1 reference style is in use, look at the column headers of a worksheet. If numbers appear for the column headings, the reference style for Excel is currently R1C1.

In this mode, cells are referenced by relative nomenclature R[-1]C[-1] or in absolute nomenclature R1C1. The letters R and C are used in both modes to represent row / column positions.

The picture below demonstrates this concept with a simple formula where the cells are referenced in R1C1 absolute nomenclature.

R1C1 Reference in an Excel Formula

Click to enlarge, scroll < > if hidden.

The example above demonstrates what R1C1 mode looks like in Excel Notice the column headers are numbers. Generally you do not build formulas in this mode, the author does not.

How to Switch Between A1 and R1C1 Cell Reference Modes on the Worksheet?

Back to FAQ for Beginning Excel >

Whatever reference style mode Excel is in, all cell references in formulas must be in that reference style form when typed. If using the mouse to select a cell reference, Excel will choose the proper syntax.

If you do not use the proper syntax, an error will be generated when the formula is entered. The A1 reference style is the easiest to use in Excel. It is recommended that this style is used when constructing formulas.

To switch between the reference modes in Excel, proceed to the Ribbon and select File / Options. On the Excel Options screen, select the Formulas tab. On that tab, check or uncheck the R1C1 reference style box. Note that when you toggle this box, the reference notation in the formulas will toggle.

When dealing with Excel and its many features and quirks, always recheck everything if switching.

Switch Between A1 and R1C1

Click to enlarge, scroll < > if hidden.

The example above demonstrates the Excel Options dialog box and how to toggle reference style mode. This is the control panel for how Excel operates. Be sure to check out the Advanced tab and General tabs as they contain a lot of Excel functionality control.
Need Help? Please call us at 1.805.498.7162

Copyright © 2002-2022

EMAGENIT All Rights Reserved